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Winder-Barrow High principal: Community has always put high value on education

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Winder-Barrow High School principal Al Darby was introduced by Barrow County Historical Society president Ray Mattison at the recent spring meeting of the society held at the Statham Community Center.

Winder-Barrow High School principal Al Darby was introduced by Barrow County Historical Society president Ray Mattison at the recent spring meeting of the society held at the Statham Community Center. The crowd enjoyed a buffet dinner catered by The Master’s Table. See LeAnne Akin’s photo gallery of scenes from the evening below.

Winder-Barrow High School principal Al Darby, a 1992 graduate of W-BHS and featured speaker at the April 19 spring meeting of the Barrow County Historical Society, said it has been an honor and a privilege to return to his alma mater.

At the meeting hosted in the Statham Community Center, he was introduced by Ray Mattison, president of the historical society.

Darby played basketball and baseball at Limestone College and earned a Bachelor of Science from the University of Georgia in 1996 before pursuing a Master’s at Clarke Atlanta University in 2003 and a Doctorate of Educational Leadership in 2010.

He noted that the average service of a school’s principal nationally is two and a half years and 1.9 years for a superintendent, but Winder-Barrow High School’s principals developed a culture, a climate at the school that goes hand in hand with the values and purpose of what education is doing.

While the community grew up along the railroad tracks and textiles, “Barrow County has always put education at the top of the list,” said Darby, who pointed to points of pride tied to the agricultural roots: Statham having Georgia’s first FFA chapter and Winder’s being the 68th. “And FFA is one of those organizations that still make a difference,” he said.

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Antiques & Artisans: Festival, food, fun in Braselton

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Shoppers arrived at the Braselton Antique and Artisan Festival on Friday to discover an array of shopping and dining opportunities as 150 vendors including food trucks filled the festival area. The festival continues though Sunday and attracts thousands to the area well known for antiques.

Shoppers arrived at the Braselton Antique and Artisan Festival on Friday to discover an array of shopping and dining opportunities as 150 vendors including food trucks filled the festival area. The festival continues though Sunday and attracts thousands to the area well known for antiques.

The Braselton Antique and Artisan Festival got under way Friday afternoon as the rain stopped and sunshine greeted those who arrived in downtown Braselton for the biggest spring show in the festival’s 13-year history.

As the sun began to beat down on umbrella-carrying festival-goers, the Jack’s Bar & Grill booth, located near Braselton Park where vendors filled the area and flowed along nearby streets, became a popular destination. Food trucks were intermingled throughout the festival area.

With the skies turning blue and a weekend weather forecast promising great outdoor shopping and dining opportunity at the festival during the Town of Braselton’s centennial year, the festival is likely to attract thousands.

13th semi-annual Braselton Antique & Artisan Festival
Downtown Braselton
Friday, April 22, Until 7 p.m.
Saturday,  April 23, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Sunday, April 24, 10 a.m. to  5 p.m.

Take Exit 129 off Interstate 85, turn east onto Highway 53 and follow the signs.

Visit www.countrysideantiques.net for more information.

 

BULLI offers opportunities to get involved, connect with others

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Bulli_Summer16_Page_01Are you looking for a chance to be engaged and involved, sharing your time with others while sharing ideas and fueling off each other’s energy? BULLI for you.

Brenau University Learning & Leisure Institute (BULLI) is a 21-year-old volunteer run organization focused on continuing and expanding opportunities for BULLI to enrich the lives of community members. The BULLI slogan is “Where Intellectual Curiosity Meets Friendship and Fun.”

A chance to learn more about BULLI and summer offerings will be Tuesday, May 3, at Mayfield Dairy Visitors Center at 1160 Broadway Ave., (Highway 124) in Braselton. Beginning with a 5:30 p.m. social gathering, you can scoop up some information about how members have enjoyed previous BULLI classes while enjoying some Mayfield Dairy ice cream. What a sweet treat!

Registration activities get under way at 6 p.m. with instructors and facilitators, who are university professors, community experts or qualified BULLI members sharing their knowledge and expertise,   insight into what their courses will entail for the summer session. Courses are non-credit with no exams.

Courses are $40 each and you can take as many as desired. Short courses are priced by length. Registration is first-come, first-served so attendance at the registration event is encouraged. You can also register at Braselton Town Hall through May 13 or call Braselton Town Manager Jennifer Dees at 706-654-5720.

Summer registration is May 5-13 for programs in Braselton as well as on the Gainesville campus, and the required membership fee for the remaining quarter of the academic year is only $60. That membership also gets you connected to available BULLI classes, newsletters, discounted Brenau Fitness Center membership, Brenau Trustee Library privileges and access to social events and field trips as well as international travel opportunities.

Braselton courses for summer will include Contemporary Watercolor for Newbies and Stayin’ Alive, a basic handgun course with Braselton Assistant Police Chief Lou Solis. Braselton short courses will feature Tea Time in the Mud and Social Media 101.

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This weekend’s Antique & Artisan Festival in downtown Braselton expected to bring crowds to popular antique destination

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Donna Cannella is ready to get signs out for this weekend's Braselton Antique & Artisan Show, the largest spring show in the festival's 13-year history.

Donna Cannella is ready to get signs out for this weekend’s Braselton Antique & Artisan Show, the largest spring show in the festival’s 13-year history.

The Braselton Antique & Artisan Festival on April 22-24 will be the biggest spring show in the festival’s 13-year history, according to Donna Cannella of Countryside Antiques, who is coordinating with wife, Peggy Kriegel.

Rebranding the name with artisan better reflects the festival’s offerings which will feature dealers from the Carolinas, Tennessee, Alabama and Florida and all around Georgia, sand Cannella, who notes it’s a sold-out show. The festival is free and offers free parking. Festival hours are 2-7 p.m. on Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday.

“We’ll have a lot of repeat vendors as well as new ones with repurposing very popular and showing how innovative and funky repurposed items can be,” said Cannella. Look for architectural pieces, ironworks, statuary and handcrafted items as well as the offerings from five plant nurseries to continue the springtime spotlight on creating a more beautiful outdoor living space. Annuals and perennials, shrubs, trees and unusual plants will be available.

“Peggy and I hand-selected the vendors after making trips to festivals ,events and venues around Marietta, Ellijay, Blue Ridge and beyond,” said Cannella, who notes that donning festival T-shirts and handing out information on the festival, held in the spring and fall, has helped to build the festival’s participation and attendance. When Cannella assumed coordination of the festival in 2008, there were 32 vendors and it’s now at nearly 150.

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Pinwheels for Prevention: Prevent Child Abuse Piedmont

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Nearly 200 colorful pinwheels were planted at the Jackson County Historic Courthouse on April 11 to symbolize the 196 substantiated cases of child abuse and neglect in Jackson County in Fiscal Year 2015.

Nearly 200 colorful pinwheels were planted at the Jackson County Historic Courthouse on April 11 to symbolize the 196 substantiated cases of child abuse and neglect in Jackson County in Fiscal Year 2015.

Colorful pinwheels were placed on the yard of the Jackson County Historical Courthouse on April 11 to mark the month’s observance of Child Abuse Prevention Month in the Piedmont Judicial Circuit.

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Jackson County took an active role in decorating the Washington Street side of the historic courthouse where a large banner was placed. A smaller sign spells out the sad fact: Jackson County had 196 substantiated cases of child abuse and neglect.

At the April 4 meeting of the Jackson County Board of Commissioners, Piedmont CASA executive director Michelle Black said that 196 pinwheels were to be spinning to recognize the number of cases of reported child abuse and neglect substantiated by the Department of Family & Children Services in 2015.

A proclamation was approved by the commissioners.

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